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1930’s Bow Neck Blouses

1930s bow neck blouses

We continue our search for bow necked inspiration as we peek through the decades for the Bow Neck Blouse Sewalong with a selection of drawings of fashions from the 1930′s. All of the images are from Everyday Fashions of the Thirties as pictured in Sears Catalogs. I’m really intrigued by the construction of the blouse on the right. Not only does it have a bow at the neck, but I love the way the blousy bodice top gathers into a yoke at the bottom (with even more bows at the side!). In these dresses from 1930, you can see the boxiness that we typically associate with the 20’s. If one bow at the neck isn’t enough for you, how about adding a row of bows all the way down the front bodice, like the dress on the right? On an interesting note, these dresses were sold as “semi-made”, meaning that …

The 1930’s Scrapbook

1930s Scrabook by Rober Opie

One last birthday present post. Adam’s grandmother, Nanny Sheila, sent me this delightful coffee table book called The 1930’s Scrapbook, compiled by Robert Opie.

Mom Made Birthday Presents

sewing mends the soul pillow

In honor of my birthday last week, and my visit to my mom’s house over the weekend, this week of posts is going to be todo sobre mi madre. In short, my mom is amazingly creative and talented and inspiring. She’s a phenomenal quilter, applique-er, and stitcher, amongst so many other talents and I’m so excited to show off some of her amazing work!

Relating the Colors Worn to the Pigmentation of the Hair and Eyes (1931)

hues found in eyes

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. Chapter VI: Relating the Colors Worn to the Pigmentation of the Hair and Eyes The effect of colors upon the hair and eyes should be carefully considered, even though these points should be subordinated to that of selecting colors becoming to the skin. The person with a slender and well-proportioned figure, who need not fear increasing her size or emphasizing her silhouette and who has a clear, healthy complexion, can wear almost any beautiful color. She may consider her eyes and hair first, emphasizing whichever is the more attractive feature. Occasionally persons with unusually beautiful hair or eyes can afford to wear colors enhancing their most distinctive feature, even at …

Relating the Colors Worn to the Pigmentation of the Skin (1931)

hues found in background skin tones

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. Chapter V: Relating the Colors Worn to the Pigmentation of the Skin Although one may make general classification of colors suited to types, specific recommendations of colors becoming to individuals should be based upon analysis of their skin, hair, and eyes. Make-up   Powder should match background color – Powder should be used, not to change the color of the skin, but to improve its texture, remove shine, and veil imperfections. Hue of rouge should match skin – The color of rouge and lipstick has great influence upon the apparent coloring of the individual. In most instances, rouge and lipstick should match the hue found in the wearer’s skin. Make-up …

The Hat is the Background for the Face (Continued) (1931)

vintage 1930s hat brims

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. In this section, the author gives suggestions for problem features. She gives pretty brutally honest descriptions of facial “imperfections,” but at least I now know what sort of hat to wear to hide my big nose and embarrassing glasses! Chapter IV: The Hat is the Background for the Face (continued) Turned-up nose. – Hats that have an upward sweeping line at the front unduly emphasize the upward curving line of the nose that is politely termed retroussé. A curving brim that appears to repeat exactly the profile line of the nose may give a truly ridiculous effect.  A soft brim, one that droops rather than curves downward, shadows the face …

The Hat is the Background for the Face (1931)

Hat Width

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. Chapter IV: The Hat is the Background for the Face The hat can probably do more to alter the contours of the face than any other item of wearing apparel. It may form a frame softening the outlines of the face. Lacking sufficient size to form a frame, it may reveal the features frankly, to their advantage, perhaps, if they are good, to their disadvantage, if they are not perfect enough to be thrown into relief. A small, close-fitting hat that is narrower than the widest part of the face fives the features undue prominence, making them seem large and out of proportion. A close-fitting hat should be slightly wider …

Necklines Frame the Face (1931)

Collar widens or lengthens face

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. Chapter III: Necklines Frame the Face The frame for the face provided by necklines and collars greatly influences the apparent shape of the face. Necklines should be chosen carefully with consideration of their becomingness, their effect upon the contours of the face, for probably no other detail of a garment is so important in its effect upon the appearance of the wearer. A high, close collar covering the neck, or a scarf wrapped in high, close effect, shortens the face and thereby increases its apparent width. Horizontal lines leading the eye across the face and neck tend to increase their apparent width. The round neckline tends to carry the eye …

Earrings and Necklaces Change Apparent Contours of Face

1930's Earrings

The latest in a series of excerpts from “A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress” by Laurine Hempstead, copyright 1931 – a delightful book on dressing to complement your figure with vintage tips that hold true today. Chapter II Earrings and Necklaces Change Apparent Contours of Face The lines that may be introduced into the costume by means of costume jewelry materially affect the apparent shape of the face. They should not be worn thoughtlessly, but only after careful study – before a mirror. All earrings tend to increase the apparent width of the face, leading the observer’s eye across the face from ear to ear rather than up and down. For this reason they are becoming to many women, especially those whose faces are too thin or too narrow in structure. A few longer strands of beads, one, two, or sometimes three, arranged so that …

A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: The Hairdress Shapes the Face

1930's Hairstyles

I just found the most wonderful vintage book on how to dress for your figure. A Correct Costume Enhances the Wearer: Color and Line in Dress by Laurine Hempstead with Sketches and Color Samples Copyright 1931 It starts with the face and discusses things like coloring, jewelry, and hair. It moves to the body offering tips for problems such as large hips and round shoulders. It then goes through ages from children, to “the miss in her ‘teens”, through to elderly women. I’m so in love with this book and I think it’s so wonderful that I’ll be sharing excerpts. The book has the most delightful vintage feel to it, beautiful illustrations, and genuinely good advice. I hope you love it as much as I do! It begins: Part I: Faces Any woman can approach beauty through manipulation of line and color to her advantage. A correct and becoming costume …