10

Laser Cut Logo Keychains

I played with lasers! It was fun! One of my girlfriends was working on prototyping a fancy tool to hold her microscopy slides and it involved getting trained on (and access to) a laser cutter and a 3-D printer. Before leaving San Francisco, I simply had to get the chance to play on use the laser cutter myself, because, well, lasers! I bought a sheet of pink acrylic and cut out a bunch of circles with bits of my logo on them. The laser cutter imports .ai files so it was very easy for me to create the necessary file to guide the laser cutting. The file needed to be un-filled shapes with the outline color telling the machine which order to cut. I’m not actually sure what to do with all these cut circles (other than make keychains) now that they are cut, so I welcome any ideas! I saved …

11

RNA Splicing Gel Quilt

I still can’t quite believe that I finished grad school before several of my Girls (my support network for the 7 years of graduate school). Fortunately, they aren’t far behind, and since the end is clearly in sight, I thought it was appropriate to get a head start on graduation quilts. This quilt is for Argenta, based on an assay that she ran many, many times in graduate school. I hope that every time she sees the quilt she is reminded of her triumphs – triumph over this assay and triumph over graduate school. It’s my reminder to her of how awesome she is, for the scientist that she has become, the person that she has become, and the friend that she always has been. (I’m making all my Girls quilts to celebrate their graduations, so check out Erica’s Ninja Cells Quilt and Ellen’s Hst3 Degron Quilt for the first in …

10

Hst3 Degron Quilt

Science is beautiful in so many ways. A clean western blot lends itself so nicely to a modern quilt design like in this quilt, but what is most beautiful to me about this quilt is what it represents – my love for an amazing female scientist and friend whose support was instrumental in me personally getting through graduate school. This quilt is based on a piece of data from my friend Ellen’s thesis research and was a gift from me to her to celebrate her achievement of her Ph.D. (I’m making all my Girls quilts to celebrate their graduations, so check out Erica’s Ninja Cells Quilt for the first in the series.) I had a fun time quilting the quilt on my home sewing machine, and chose to use all white thread on a black backing so that the quilt design is visible on the back of the quilt. Triangles …

13

Ninja Cells Quilt

There is no way that I could have maintained the shred of sanity to which I have clung through graduate school if it wasn’t for my Girls. I’ve been meeting 5 female classmates for dinner, every other week, for the last 6 years. I cannot even begin to put words to how much support, and love, and advice, and compassion, and help, and advice, and friendship they have given me. Epic amounts. Incomprehensible amounts. As my Girls are graduating one by one, I wanted to give each of them a special thank-you for the role they have played in this phase of my life. So, I asked each to give me favorite data and I used that to design and make a quilt for each Girl. My science inspired thank-you quilt series begins with Erica’s Ninja Cells. Erica took this image of two cells under a microscope years ago and …

5

The Beginning of a Purple Mystery Organ Needlepoint

I’ve started a new needlepoint project to follow up my Anatomical Heart Needlepoint. I decided to do it in 6 shades of purple that I hand dyed. It will be several inches larger than the heart, perfect for turning into a pillow for our couch :) I tied a bunch of hanks of natural 50% wool 50% silk yarn (following my own tutorial) and dyed them in a pot on my stove. I wantonly mixed red and blue dye in two different batches (the top and bottom rows shown above) so I ended up with two slightly differently hued sets. To get the variety of shades along the top row, I put the first hank in for 15m, the second for 5 min, the third I dipped in, and the last two I got wet before dipping in. Dying them in sequential order, the earlier hanks take up the majority …

2

Bougle Leg Embroidery – Pattern from Victorian Anatomical Drawing

Being stuck on the couch with an injury does have some silver linings. One of them has been ample time for hand work which has resulted in me finishing a new embroidery project. Bougle’s Leg is an embroidery pattern based on an anatomical drawing from 1899 by Joulien Bougle (making it from the Victorian era). It uses three colors (black, red, and blue) and is all done in stem stitch. The finished embroidery is 16″ long and 3″ wide. Most of it is done with one strand of embroidery floss although there are a few places that use two or three strands to get the wider veins. This makes for an easy project with a striking end result. This is the second project in my series of needlework patterns based on Joulien Bougle’s drawings. The first was an anatomical heart needlepoint. I’ve taken up needlework recently as a means of …