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Ultraviolet Sweatshirt Hack

Fall is most definitely here. I adore fall. I love putting on rain boots and stomping through puddles. I love apple cakes and spiced cider. I love cuddly sweatshirts. Though I do have one cuddly-but-also-fashionable sweatshirt, there is certainly room in my closet for more. This Ultraviolet Tee hacked into a sweatshirt is a welcome addition! It’s pretty easy to draft your own sleeves to add on to the Ultraviolet Tee to make your own long-sleeve shirt or sweatshirt. Since the tee pattern has a short cut-on sleeve already, it’s really simple to just add length to the bottom. Since the shirt is a boxy style, boxy (i.e. easy!) sleeves are a well suited addition. This is what my sleeve looks like. You can make the wrist narrower or wider, depending on your style preference. It’s likely you’ll want them to be shorter (as I have very long arms). Remember …

Electron Layette Sewalong: Sweatshirt

The first step is to select your fabric. The sweatshirt calls for a mid-weight knit with less than 20% stretch. This means fabrics like french terry, sweatshirting, even fleece or ponte. For more about selecting fabric, see the post on Choosing Fabric for the Electron Layette. Along with your fabric, the notions you need are snaps and interfacing. Cut your fabric. If you cut your pattern pieces out with your fabric on a single layer you can squeeze it into a smaller amount of fabric. Regardless, you need to end up with 2 fronts (mirror images of each other), 2 sleeves, 2 pockets (optional), 1 back, and 1 back neck facing. Note that there are two options for the neck facing piece – one has size 3 months, 9 months, and 18 months on it while the other has size newborn, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years on it. The …

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Green Jasper Sweater Sweatshirt

It’s about time that I sewed a Jasper. I’ve adored this pattern from afar since Lisa released it but my sewing queue is always so gigantic and I’m so easily distracted by shiny things (literally and figuratively) that even my grandest intentions often go a while before being fulfilled. Speaking of intentions, I do intend to sew this into a dress this winter too. Come on self – make it happen! I call this a sweater sweatshirt because the I was drawn to the sweatshirt fleece for how it looked like a sweater knit (and for how it was bright green, if we’re being honest). Something about the prominence of the knit stitches and the heathered green makes it almost look like it could be a nice heavy knit. In fact, it’s a cheap sweatshirt fleece from that big box sewing store we all love to hate. I bought it …

10

Smile Together Sweatshirts

Even in challenging times, especially in challenging times, we must continue to create things of beauty and joy. I fully admit that these sweatshirts aren’t works of beauty. But they are certainly joyful. I know nothing about the politics of the man working the checkout counter at Target, the woman waiting for coffee in line next to me at Starbucks, or my neighbors taking their dog for a walk. What I do know is that this sweatshirt made them each smile. We shared in a moment of togetherness, of community, of joy, because of giant furry cat noses. And I guess that does make this sweatshirt something beautiful. If you can believe it, this ridiculous cat fabric came from the thrift store this week. Total serendipity and exactly what I needed. The contrast is a heavy t-shirt weight double knit I bought at Joanns and stashed forever ago, knowing I’d …

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The Sweatshirt That Shouldn’t Have Been a Flop

I love the pattern (having drafted it for myself and used it for another sweater that gets tons of wear). I love the fabrics (having made several pairs of leggings from the ridiculous scuba print that I adore). I love the color (me and fuchsia get along real well). I love sweatshirts (I wear a seriously high quotient of sweatshirts). And yet this combo of fuchsia and scuba sweatshirt is a flop. I really tried wearing it for a couple of weeks but I just gave up and sent it to the thrift store. It’s funny because I don’t think it looks that bad in the photos – but part of the reason is that I figured out exactly how the sweatshirt needs to sit to look right, and it only does that when I’m carefully posing for a photo. A big part of what was so successful in the first go …

10

A Couple of Sweatshirts

When I ordered both solid grey and maroon fleck sweatshirt fabrics from Minerva Crafts (free as part of their blogging network), I had grand visions of a colorblocked sweatsuit. When the fabrics arrived, I changed my mind because I didn’t like the two colors together like I thought I would (it’s so hard to order fabric online sometimes) and I realized that, now that I work at home, I really don’t need any more excuses to not actually get dressed for the day and sweatpants barely count as getting dressed. So, I rattled through about 400 different permutations of what these fabrics could become and I am absolutely thrilled with where I ended up! For the grey fabric, I used a vintage Butterick pattern from 1976, Butterick 6336. Although the pattern calls for a woven, I thought that a stable knit like the grey sweatshirt fabric (which has almost no …

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Newcastle Cardigan for Adam

I finally sewed Adam a real piece of clothing. I’ve made him ties and pajama bottoms before, but never a  garment that he can wear daily. Every time he mentions needing a new piece of clothing (I need more dress shirt. I could use a pair of chinos. etc.) I offer to make them for him, but he always hems and haws and goes ahead and buys the item. And then I saw the Newcastle Cardigan pattern by Thread Theory and showed Adam the pattern, saying that I thought it would be very handsome on him and I would make it for him. And he liked it and said “Yes. That would be great. Can I help pick the fabric? You’ve never offered to sew anything for me before.” And I was like “Whaaaat????” It turns out, that in Adam’s head, all those “I can make that for you” offers …